The Age of the Avocado 🥑

They’re everywhere. It’s like an invasion.

They’re on my Facebook timeline, in my housemates fridge, on my boyfriend’s Nando’s burger. The world is obsessed with avocados. Our generation are the Avocadian’s, and we are completely fixated on this green thing with a big ball in the middle.

“Hey, that looks like a normal and simple dinner, lets throw some walnuts on those fajitas.”

My beef, however, is not with this fruit/nut/seed. My issue is with what the avocado represents: the pinnacle of health and happiness. The sliced avocado is essential to a Tasty video now. You cannot touch a sandwich in Pret a Manger that has not been smothered in green mush. And my big question is- what is the big deal?

Toast is no longer a nutritious and healthy breakfast unless it’s covered in almond butter and chia seeds. ‘Nice Cream’ has replaced good old fashioned ice cream with a frozen banana imitation. We have become obsessed with supplements and proteins, and with ingesting random nutrients in odd ingredients that we think we need in abundance.”Hey, that looks like a normal and simple dinner, lets throw some walnuts on those fajitas.”

If you really do like the taste of spirulina powder, than be my guest.

And I myself am not immune to this healthy craze. For my (failed) ‘new year new me’ attempt at Christmas, I found myself ordering Spirulina powders and clearing the shelves of Holland and Barrett, desperately trying to associate myself within this sphere of ‘clean eating’. And it’s taken me till the end of January to realise that all of these health kick items have not only NOT enhanced my life, but have in fact made my lifestyle pretty sodding dull. My smoothies no longer taste like fruit, but like the dehydrated seaweed I’ve been throwing in to them. My toast is far less enjoyable now I’ve replaced Marmite with almond butter, and I’ve realised I really do like my white grain rice.

Please, do not get the wrong end of the stick with what I am saying. I am not, by any means, condemning healthy eating. In fact, I think it’s a very good thing that the Avocadian’s are more concerned about their health and their lifestyle choices than previous generations. I just think we’re taking it a little bit too far, throwing money at ‘health fads’ and concerning ourself too much with weird and wonderful food stuffs.

If you really do like the taste of spirulina powder, than be my guest. But please don’t make me eat it too.

Oh, and on a final point, do we really need an emoji for them as well? 🥑

 

DISCLAIMER: I like avocados (never thought I’d have to write this in a disclaimer statement), and have no personal problem with them. I’m referring to them as a symbol for clean eating, and fully appreciate if you like them too. 🙂